Carl Zeiss Werra family

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Carl Zeiss Werra camera family

Prologue

I can think of no mechanical product that celebrates 65, yet still looks fresh and is usable. 65 years are almost three generations, where technology, style, use, materials, and so on have evolved. Today, a product made just a decade ago is of no use and carries no sentimental value.

Enter the Werra. Introduced in 1954 and looks as fresh as the latest digital camera. A camera that is simple to use and a pleasure to hold. Small, even at today’s minuscule standards, yet advanced enough for a demanding photographer. Like Dorian Gray, it is still at its prime while other products have long become stale.

The Werra was made within one year from concept to production, using pencils, drawing boards, and slide rulers, with no CAD in sight. Conceived with no market research, giving the engineers a free hand to plan without any external influence. Designed along with the Bauhouse principles that gave it an eternal flair. And all that by the nation that made the Trabant.

The manufacturing background is as if history pulled a joke. Eisfeld, the city where the Werra was made is as much a hole in the wall as it can be in Germany. Before the war, the factory that came to be known as Carl Zeiss used to make binoculars and a secondary line of optical equipment. The only other claim to fame for Eisfeld Is a razor factory that has been there since forever and now makes razor blades under Harry’s.  Other than that, there was no significant industry present. Jena, Zeiss’ birthplace, is about an hour and a half drive. Buchenwald, a concentration camp complex as large as a city, was just a stone’s throw away from Jena. About 300,000 prisoners passed through Buchenwald; whereat its peak some 100,000 were kept there, working for the German war industries. Some 60.000 were murdered there and the rest were transport to the death camps. In comparison, the population of Jena today is about 110.000, and Eisfeld has 8,000.

The reasons why the authorities chose this location and this particular product are shroud in fog.  An online source suggests that there was a 20,000 strong demonstration demanding employment for the area. I find it hard to believe. The GDR did not tolerate demonstrations well. The authorities would have shot a few so the rest would disperse, or have arrested the lot. Further, judging by the city population I doubt if there could not be 20,000 demonstrators. Lastly, a camera factory is not a practical way to provide employment in the rural countryside.

There is also a thought that the East Germans planned to make a camera for the masses, a Volkskamera. I wonder if the Communists cared much about that so close to the war’s end.

What could have happened could be more prosaic. At the war’s end, the Soviets looted the German industries. Factories were entirely moved beyond the Soviet lines, together with the workforce. After so many years, when the exiled Germans trained enough Russian and Ukrainian, they were allowed back to East Germany, trading one workers’ paradise with another. The GDR was cash strapped, as was entire Europe, so making cameras for export deemed to be a good idea. I assume the factory premises were not damaged, as there was no reason for the Allied to flatten it or the area.

The facts are that a group of engineers, designers, and trades were set together in an abandoned factory and in less than a year hatched a camera like never seen before. Or after. In ordinary time, there would be an idea, defined target market, concept, technical details, and prototypes, back and forth to the drawing board. But that was not an ordinary time. Also, designers did not have an existing schema to base on, so they came out with this unique product.  It was named Werra after the river that runs just south of the city and colored green after Thuringia, the state called ‘the green heart of Germany’.

This factory made only the Werra camera. True to the socialist planned economy principles that killed anything that workes, Pentacon took it over and shut it down in 1968 after producing over 520,000 cameras.

Naming

I assume that the Werras were not meant for local consumption but targeted for export. With this in mind, the makers did all they could to confuse the capitalist bourgeois who will buy these cameras. They have sure achieved that by the marking and naming conventions.

There were three options as to where the camera name could be found: front, back, or none at all. In addition, the cameras marked Werra and Werra 1 are identical. Further, each model in the lineup has an ‘e’ version; presumably for export, else identical to the base model. Body marking is still the same as the latter.

Searching for references, there is as much contradicting information as the sources. Regrettably, this seems to be the norm. The early models were also defined with a letter after the model number, as shown in the table below. I had to stitch together details from different sources, trust it makes some sense.

Style

The camera kept its distinct appearance throughout the models, where the body came in a flat or curved top, with matching straight-lined or rounded snout respectively. Throughout the line, the ‘e’ model was dressed up with a clear / lined forehead. Other variants were minor, such as the frame counter and the winding knob at the bottom, which saw slight changes. Also, the first model base was 2mm shorter than the following.

Still within the above shape variations, as models progressed, there were added light meter lens, rangefinder window, or both. See sketches below for easy identification.

Controls

The Werra’s unique feature is locating all controls on the lens barrel. A screw-on, cup-like cover is mounted over the barrel. It doubles as a sunshade, with the end cap removed. I cannot recall seeing such  cover on any other camera. Note that screwing back the cap, an aggressive turn will cock the camera.

Cocking and winding are by turning the wide ring closest to the camera body. It takes a short turn, about a one-eight of a circle, and it is good to go. Intuitively I turned it outwards, to the right, but it takes being turned left.

In front of the winding ring are the shutter speed markings on a fixed ring, where the speed is selected via a sunken dial in front of it, operated via two protruding pins. A tiny red dot marks the chosen speed, visible only when the camera front Is facing up. Guess a small price to pay for the futuristic design. DOF markings follow next, and after that the focusing scale based on an estimate. The unit I have is marked with feet and meters, meaning manufacturers looked at the UK and US markets. The aperture setting dial is at the front end; here, the scale values turn with the focusing ring, so it may take turning the camera upside down if the distance set to close up.

The viewfinder window is bright and clear, 1:1, with a composition subframe. Later models had other viewing ratios.

Frame counter and rewind knob are bottom-mounted, leaving the top cover clear, keeping with the camera’s distinctive appearance. Both knobs had slightly evolved with further models. Mount thread is 3/8″ as the German cameras of that time. As a side note, it is interesting that while German cameras are metric and the Japanese subscribe to JIS, which is based upon the metric standard; yet till today all cameras carry a mount thread based on the long-defunct BSW.

Later models added controls and restyled existing ones, yet all remain on the lens barrel. The rangefinder option added parallax marks in the finder, with a very clear split window. Speed and aperture markings are larger, engraved on white background. Protruding pins on the speed dial replaced with easy-to-use knurled pads, with a similar pad on the aperture dial. Both dials are set against a red dot on the fixed part of the barrel.

The lightmeter model added to the lens barrel a film speed selector, a pain to read, which could be forgiven as it takes setting change only with using a different media. DOF scale is by the front end. The metering is displayed as an elongated rectangle at the bottom of the viewer where a black fill slides right or left, marked with a middle indentation for the ideal setting.

Models with flash sync carry ‘X’ & ‘M’ selector at the bottom, some with added ‘V’ for self-timer.

Models with removable lens assembly added an additional ring, unmarked,  on the lens barrel. A slight turn and the front lens assembly pop out. There was a scant lens offering for the Werra, and a changed lens added a superficial viewer lens to compensate. Remounting the lens takes matching a tiny screw head with a groove on the body and turning back the unmarked ring.

Late Werra models

Werra added advanced configurations, presumably to catch up with the competition at the other side of the border. Werramat and Werramatic of the traditional style or the ‘e’ version were slight variations of the Werra four and five. The Werramat Super and Werra Supermat were the last models offered before the company was shut down.

Small batches were made of special use cameras, with an endoscope and microscope attachments. Some still show up on eBay. Some makers clamped two Werras together for stereo configurations, either mounted upside down or side by side. I don’t think they have any value save for novelty.

Werra cameras evolution

Model Year type Lens make Lens Speeds Shoe Light meter Style
1 Werra Green 1954 Viewfinder Tessar, Novonar 2.8/50 B, 1-250 No No Flat top
2 Werra 1 Black 1955 Viewfinder Tessar, Novonar 2.8/50, 3,5/50 B, 1-250 No No Flat top
3 Werra 1 Blue 1955 Viewfinder Tessar, Novonar 2.8/50, 3,5/50 B, 1-250 No No Flat top
4 Werra 1 Braun 1955 Viewfinder Tessar, Novonar 2.8/50, 3,5/50 B, 1-250 No No Flat top
5 Werra 1 Green 1955 Viewfinder Tessar, Novonar 2.8/50, 3,5/50 B, 1-250 No No Flat top
6 Werra 1 Silver 1955 Viewfinder Tessar 2.8/50 B, 1-250 No No Flat top
7 Werra 1a 1958 Viewfinder Tessar, Jena 2.8/50 B, 1-250 No No Flat top
8 Werra 1b 1959 Viewfinder Tessar, Jena 2.8/50 B, 1-250 No No Flat top
9 Werra 1c 1962 Viewfinder Tessar, Jena 2.8/50 B, 1-750 No No Flat top
10 Werra 1f 1965 Viewfinder Tessar, Jena 2.8/50 B, 1-750 Yes No Flat top
11 Werra 1e 1964 Viewfinder Tessar, Jena 2.8/50 B, 1-750 Yes No Flat top, lined front
12 Werra 2 Black 1957 Viewfinder Tessar, Jena 2.8/50 B, 1-750 No Selenium, covered lens Flat top
13 Werra 2 Green 1957 Viewfinder Tessar, Jena 2.8/50 B, 1-750 No Selenium, covered lens Flat top
14 Werra 2a 1961 Viewfinder Tessar, Jena 2.8/50 B, 1-750 No Selenium, covered lens Curved top
15 Werra 2b 1964 Viewfinder Tessar, Jena 2.8/50 B, 1-750 No Selenium, exposed lens Curved top
16 Werra 2d 1964 Viewfinder Telesar 2.8/50 B, 1-750 No Selenium, covered lens Curved top
17 Werra 2e 1964 Viewfinder Tessar, Jena 2.8/50 B, 1-750 Yes Selenium, covered lens Curved top, lined front
18 Werra 3 Black 1958 Rangefinder Tessar, Jena 2.8/50 B, 1-750 No No Flat top
19 Werra 3 Green 1958 Rangefinder Tessar, Jena 2.8/50 B, 1-750 No No Flat top
20 Werra 3e 1964 Rangefinder Tessar, Jena 2.8/50 B, 1-750 Yes No Curved top, lined front
21 Werra 4 Green / Black 1958 Rangefinder Tessar, Jena 2.8/50 B, 1-500 No Selenium, covered lens Flat top
22 Werra 5 Green / Black 1960 Rangefinder Tessar, Jena 2.8/50 B, 1-500 No Selenium, covered lens Curved top
23 Werra Endoscopy 1955 Niche None No No
24 Werra Microscope 1960 Niche None No No
25 Werramat 1961 Viewfinder Jena 2.8/50 B, 1-750 No Selenium, exposed lens Curved top
26 Werramat E 1965 Viewfinder Jena 2.8/50 B, 1-750 Yes Selenium, exposed lens Curved top, lined front
27 Werramatic 1961 Rangefinder Jena 2.8/50 B, 1-750 No Selenium, exposed lens Curved top
28 Werramatic E 1964 Rangefinder Jena 2.8/50 B, 1-750 Yes Selenium, exposed lens Curved top, lined front
29 Werra Supermat 1963 Viewfinder Tessar 2.8/50 B, 1-750 No Selenium, exposed lens Curved top
30 Werramat Super 1965 Viewfinder Tessar 2.8/50 B, 1-750 No Selenium, exposed lens Curved top

 

Werra cameras identification:

Werra green, the first in the Werra line. Introduced 1955. Werra 1 models Black, blue or brown are similar to the early green model. Common lens: Tessar 2.8/50. Speeds B, 1-250. Timer: on some production series. Fixed lens

 

1B, 1C, 1D, and 1F were introduced in 1965 with a cold shoe. Common lens: Tessar 2.8/50. Speeds B, 1-250. Timer: on some production series. Fixed lens. Offered in green and black. A brown model is seen but could be reskinned. A silver-plated version made as premium for employees is rarely seen.

 

Werra 1e introduced 1964. Common lens: Tessar 2.8/50. Speeds B, 1-250. Timer: on some production series. Fixed lens.

 

Werra 2 Black

Werra 2 Green or black Introduced 1962. Common lens: Jena T 2.8/50. Speeds B, 1-250. Timer: on some production series. Fixed lens.

 

Werra 2e introduced in 1961. Common lens: Tessar 2.8/50. Speeds B, 1-500. Timer: Yes. Fixed lens.

 

Werra 3 Green and black introduced in 1958. Common lens: Jena T 2.8/50. Speeds B, 1-500. Timer: Yes. Interchangeable lens.

 

Werra 3e Introduced 1964. Common lens: Tessar 2.8/50. Speeds B, 1-750. Timer: Yes. Interchangeable lens.

 

 

Werra 4 green and black introduced 1958. Common lens: Telesar 2.8/50. Speeds B, 1-500. Timer: Yes. Interchangeable lens.

 

Werra 5 Green and black introduced 1960. Common lens: Tessar 2.8/50. Speeds B, 1-500. Timer: Yes. Interchangeable lens.

 

Werramat introduced in 1961. Common lens: Tessar 2.8/50. Speeds B, 1-750. Timer: Yes. Fixed lens.

 

Werramat E introduced 1965. Common lens: Tessar 2.8/50. Speeds B, 1-750. Timer: Yes. Fixed lens.

Werramatic introduced 1961. Common lens: Tessar 2.8/50. Speeds B, 1-750. Timer: Yes. Interchangeable lens.

Werramatic E introduced 1965. Common lens: Tessar 2.8/50. Speeds B, 1-750. Timer: Yes. Fixed lens.

Other models:

Werra Endoscopy and Werra Microscope – niche use models.
Werra Supermat – late edition of the Werramat.
Werramat Super.
Werramatic Super and Werra Supermatic – similar to the Supermat but with interchangeable lenses. Only prototypes were made.

 

More:

KRG about Werra.
Simon Hawketts
Seeing1

Werra cameras prices on camdex.ca
Werra cameras user manual

Werra camera images

Werra square and rounded models. The rounded style is common to the ‘e’ models.

Lens assembly cover, rounded and straight line.

Lens cover mounted and doubles as a lens hood.

Werra 1

Werra Mat

 

ir1001

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